Friday, 10 February 2017

Make do and mend

Last week I helped at the second make do and mend workshop which took place in the library of the Norwich Costume and Textile Library - I had to try continuously to keep my eyes from wandering ! 
It was another busy session this time led by Patricia ( from the Castle Museum). Louise ( from the Textiles Department) talked us through a number of items related to mending from the collections. The most memorable of these to me were miniature garments showing stages of hand sewing and mending and also what were a true delight- the sample books of sewing and mending completed by girls in the late 1800s. It was explained that these were like cv's - they would be shown to a potential employer ( for girls going into 'service') and would demonstrate their skills. Remember there were no sewing machines and what was striking was the regularity and small size of the stitches. Some mending even simulated more complex weave structures, 
Following this demonstration more recent items were shown with patching, 'moth hole disguising' by embroidery and needle felting  and I showed the 'easy weve' little loom in operation ( see previous post). 
Then it was time for the attendees to have a go at doing a patch of their own - all materials used having been prepared beforehand. There were 4 volunteers, 2 from the Norfolk Waste Department and 2 of us via Norwich  and Textile Association. We were kept busy helping as there were about 15 attendees. Some were particularly interested in knowing more about darning knitwear and I was able to demonstrate how to use duplicate stitch (Swiss Darning) to reinforce a thin area by tracing the individual stitches and also how to do more traditional darning by weaving. We discussed how to find and 'borrow' an identical thread in a garment and failing that sources locally to get a close match. Unfortunately time ran out on us. Attendees noted that they would have liked a full day for this ! 
The day really got me thinking. I could remember making a sample folder when I did O level needlework. Unfortunately I was not able to take this as a subject until the VI form.  I did so want to do needlework as one of my GCE choices but being in a small Girls Grammar school I was taken on one side and told my choices would be Biology, Physics and Chemistry as I was in the top set. I can't remember ever not being able to sew and knit, being able to do both before I started school, but it was pointed out to me that needlework was something I could ( and would do) in my spare time. I was not impressed but got on with it and in the VI form persuaded the school that I could do O level needlework in my non A level time. This I did but I had to sit at the front of what are now year 10 and 11 classes. I am glad that many things in education  have improved and this is one of them.
 (In fact I spent a career enjoying teaching science. I took a different approach in my teaching from that which I received and took much trouble to show my pupils how relevant science was to their lives and how to love science. Due to the approach I took I was able to make a contribution to science teaching nationally.) 
As my school teachers well knew I would continue with my textile interests in my spare time. I now use my science background in my dyeing ( and other textile disciplines) and still find teaching others very rewarding. 
I have enjoyed looking through my sampler folder - these are my mending samples on 1/4" gingham and plain calico 

These show the reverse side. 

These are my darning samples on woven wool - thin place darn left and hedge tear darn on right

and hole darn 


I have often met people in workshops who were not allowed to follow their subject passions at school - I hope you are not one of them.